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Subject Verb Agreement – A Deep Dive

Contents

A complete and expert’s masterpiece for the best comprehension

By Muhammad Faisal Kiani

Students’ & Teachers’ Trainer and Counselor

ECTI Pakistan


Topics For Today’s Discussion

  1. Subject-Verb Agreement or Concord Definition
  2. The Importance of Subject-Verb Agreement
  3. Subject-Verb Agreement Rules and Principles
  4. Subject-Verb Agreement “Collective Nouns”
  5. Subject-Verb Agreement “Indefinite Pronouns”
  6. Subject-Verb Agreement “Uncountable Nouns”
  7. Subject-Verb Agreement “Compound Subjects”
  8. Subject-Verb Agreement “Do and Does”
  9. Subject-Verb Agreement “Here and There”
  10. Subject-verb agreement “Or vs Nor”
  11. Subject-Verb Agreement “Is vs Are”
  12. Subject-Verb Agreement “Using All
  13. Subject-Verb Agreement “Using As Well As
  14. Subject-Verb Agreement with “Prepositional Phrases
  15. Subject-Verb Agreement with “Intervening Phrases”
  16. Subject-Verb Agreement for “Time, Money, and Distance
  17. Subject-Verb Agreement “Using Amount
  18. Subject-Verb agreement using “Units of Measurement
  19. Subject-Verb Agreement Using “Expressions of Quantity
  20. Subject-Verb Agreement in “Questions
  21. Subject-Verb Agreement “Tenses and Fragments
  22. Subject-Verb Agreement “Sentences and Examples
  23. Subject-Verb Agreement Summary
  24. Subject-Verb PDF Downloadable and Printable Resources:
  • Subject-Verb Agreement Sentences with Reasoning PDF
  • Subject-Verb Agreement Rules PDF
  • Subject-Verb Agreement MCQs Worksheet with Answer PDF
  • Subject-Verb Agreement Rules PPT

The English grammar keeps a core place for subject-verb agreement at the top. While researching, I have left almost nothing to discuss the subject-verb agreement. I wrote this masterpiece from the students’ perspective. 

It is interesting to learn it comprehensively, and my research revealed me to explain it for learning in a planned sequence. The research contains almost everything for you, such as subject-verb types, examples, rules and principles, MCQ with answers, worksheets, and printable in PDF and ppt.

Before going to explore it, let us have an overlook on the following concerning topics:

  • Subject-Verb Agreement Sentences with Reasoning PDF
  • Subject-Verb Agreement Rules PDF
  • Subject-Verb Agreement MCQs Worksheet with Answer PDF
  • Subject-Verb Agreement Rules PPT

What is the Subject-Verb Agreement or Concord?-The Clear Definition

Subject-verb agreement refers to the relationship between the subject and the verb. Subject and verb must agree with each other in a sentence. Most of the time, we will be discussing the helping verb that must be following the subject or subjects. 

In grammar, it is the art of making sure that sentence parts connect in the right way. It makes sure that a square peg goes in a square hole and not a square peg in a round hole.

In other words, if a subject is singular, its verb must also be singular, and similarly, if a subject is a plural, then its verb must also be plural. We also call it the Concord.

The Importance of Subject-Verb Agreement 

Subject-verb agreement is vital in English grammar because, without it, the reader can become confused. The subject must agree with the verb in number. Singular subjects require singular verbs. Similarly, plural subjects require plural verbs to give complete and correct meanings.

With the help of the Subject-Verb Agreement Sentences PDF and much practice, I am confident that you will master it.

Subject-Verb Agreement Rules and Principles

  1. The Number Agreement
  2. Words Between Subject and Verb
  3. “Here” or “There”
  4. Subject After Verb in Questions
  5. Joined by “and.”
  6. Two Subjects Separated by “and”
  7. “Each”, “Every” and “No”
  8. Singular Subjects that End in “S”
  9. Multiple Subjects Connected With Conjunction
  10. Singular and Plural Subjects Connected by Conjunction
  11. Units of Measurement or Time
  12. The object of the Preposition
  13. Accompanying Expressions
  14. Infinite Pronouns
  15. Singular Subjects that Sound Plural
  16. Gerunds
  17. Collective Nouns
  18. Titles of Books

Rule 1.

Verb and subject must agree in number. It is the fundamental rule that supports the basic concept. However, only the subject affects verbs! There is nothing else to consider.

The Number Agreement

Examples:

  1. The cat loves balls.
  2. Cats love balls.
  3. The dog runs when he is healthy.
  4. Dogs run when they are healthy.

Did you notice that we used ‘s’ with the verb ‘run’ for the third-person singular subject ‘the dog’ in the third sentence? Yes, you are right! The present indefinite tense requires an additional ‘s’ with the verb to make a present indefinite sense for a third-person singular subject.

Keeping the same example, you have noticed that we used ‘is’ as a singular helping verb for a singular subject. That is a perfect agreement between the subject and the verb.

In the second example, “dogs” is a plural, and we used the plural verb “run” for that. Similarly, in the second part, we used “are” for the plural “they”.

Rule 2.

Words Between Subject and Verb

The agreement between subject and verb is not affected by subordinate clauses and prepositional phrases. It is something significant to understand. 

Examples:

  • The dog, who was playing in the garden, is mine.
  • The colours of the rainbow are charming.

Rule 3.

“Here” or “There”

A subject is always placed after the verb in a sentence with “here” or “there.” It is significant to identify each part correctly.

  • There is a problem with my car.
  • There are issues with my car.
  • Here is the tool you required.
  • Here are the tools you require.

Rule 4.

Subject After Verb in Questions

It is not always the case that subjects come before verbs in questions. Identify the subject accurately before choosing the proper verb form.

  • Where are the pieces in this box?
  • Where is the key I left on the table?

Rule 5.

Joined by “and”

I consider it a very critical rule. A plural verb is typically required when “and” joins two subjects.

  • Mark and David are jumping over the mate.
  • Mark and David are going to the school.

Rule 6.

Two Subjects Separated by “and”

As observed in the previous rule, here, the verb is singular if the two subjects are separated by “and” refers to the same person or thing as a whole.

  • Fried beans and rice is my favourite dish. 
  • Noodles and meatballs are a great meal.

Rule 7.

“Each”, “Every” and “No”

We must use helping verbs as a singular when the following words come before the subject:

  • each
  • every
  • no

Examples:

  • Each one is ready to play.
  • Every man and woman is required to check in.
  • No one is allowed to play in the garden.

Rule 8.

Singular Subjects that End in “S”

Nouns such as “mathematics”, “news”, and “social studies” are singular even though they end with “s” and should be followed by singular verbs. The sentence “Mathematics is my loving subject.” uses the singular verb “is” because mathematics is one discipline.

Example:

  • Mathematics is my loving subject.

Rule 9.

Multiple Subjects Connected With Conjunction

We use singular verb If the subjects are both singular and are connected by the following words:

  • Or
  • Nor
  • neither/nor
  • either/or
  • not only/but also

Similarly, we use a plural verb If the subjects are both plurals and are connected by the abovementioned conjunction:

Here are some examples:

  • Either Emma or Mark is responsible for the decision.
  • Not only horses but also cats are available at the animal shelter.

Rule 10.

Singular and Plural Subjects Connected by Conjunction

If one subject is singular and the other is plural, and the following words connect the words:

  • Or
  • Nor
  • neither/nor
  • either/or
  • not only/but also

We use the singular helping verb if the second subject is singular. Similarly, we use plural helping verb form when the second subject is plural.

  • Either the horses or the lion has escaped.
  • Neither the lion nor the horses have escaped.

Similarly, when a subject’s sentence is composed of singular nouns or pronouns and one or more plural nouns or pronouns combined with “or” or “nor”, we should use the form of the verb that agrees with whichever noun is closest to the verb. For example, the sentence “My brother or my sisters get the email every day.” uses the plural verb “get” since the plural noun “sisters” is nearest to the verb.

  • Either the horses or the lion has escaped from the zoo.
  • Neither the lion nor the horses have escaped from the zoo.

Rule 11.

Units of Measurement or Time

Usually, singular verbs are used for measuring units or times.

  • Four quarts of oil were needed.
  • Ten minutes is enough time to get there.

Rule 12.

The object of the Preposition

The only time the object of the Preposition decides plural or singular verb forms is when noun and pronoun subjects that are followed by a prepositional phrase like:

  • Some
  • Half
  • None
  • More
  • All

Then the object of the Preposition determines the form of the verb.

  • All the chicken from the cage has gone.
  • All the birds have been freed.

Rule 13.

Infinite Pronouns

Singular verbs are typically taken with indefinite pronouns. The following pronouns are exceptions to this rule:

  • Few
  • Everybody
  • Anybody
  • Many
  • Several
  • Both

These always take the plural form.

  • Everybody wants to be liked.
  • Few were left alone after the break.

Rule 14.

Accompanying Expressions

We use a singular verb when a singular subject remains singular, even followed by the following expressions, such as:

  • With
  • accompanied by
  • Including
  • as well

A singular verb should still follow the subject. The sentence “My brother, accompanied by his friend, volunteers at the preschool every Saturday.” uses the singular verb “volunteers” because the addition of the phrase “accompanied by his friend” does not affect the singularity of the sentence’s subject.

Rule 15.

Singular Subjects that Sound Plural

We must be careful when using the following singular nouns: 

  • Either
  • Neither
  • Everyone
  • Everybody
  • Anyone
  • Nobody
  • No one

Although these nouns sound more than one person or thing, they are all singular and should be paired with singular verbs. The sentence “Everybody likes Ronaldo’s game.” uses the singular verb “likes” because “everybody” refers to each individual “body,” or person.

Rule 16.

Gerunds

If a gerund is the subject of a sentence, it takes the singular form of the verb. The plural form, however, is used when gerunds are joined by “and.”

  • Standing in the water was a bad idea.
  • Swimming in the ocean and playing drums are my hobbies.

Rule 17.

Collective Nouns

Some nouns such as “team,” “group,” “band,” “family”, and “class” imply the involvement of numerous people but are, nonetheless, singular nouns because they refer to collective entities. The sentence “The band sings my favorite song.” uses the singular verb “sings.” Although the band consists of more than one member, the subject “band” refers to the group as a whole unit.

Depending on the context, collective nouns like “team” or “staff” can be singular or plural. The singular form is usually used, as the collective noun is treated as a single, cohesive entity.

  • The herd is drinking water.
  • The flock is flying.

Rule 18.

Titles of Books

The titles of novels, movies and other similar works are singular and have singular verbs.

  • The Bugs is an old movie starring Tom.
  • The Old Man and The Sea is my favourite novel.

The errors of a subject-verb agreement are among the most common mistakes in English grammar. The general rule refers that singular nouns should agree with singular verbs, while plural nouns should accompany plural verbs. It can be confusing to determine whether a noun is singular or plural. A writer or student must be familiar with several types of subject-verb agreement to produce grammatically correct work. 

After discussing rules and kinds of subject-verb agreement, we need to move to some critical and discussable topics that will clarify more in detail.

Subject-Verb Agreement for Collective Nouns

Yes, here is the topic you require to focus on well. Can a singular collective noun take a singular or plural verb? It depends. It takes a singular verb if the collective noun refers to the group as a whole. On the other hand, The verb should be plural if it refers to the individuals or parts of the group. Understand the need for the singular or plural verb accurately to the collective noun in the following sentences.

  • This organization puts on a barbecue every summer.

In this sentence, the collective noun organization requires the singular verb because the staff acts as a unit. All the members of the organization are acting in unison.

  • The flute ensemble is playing at the National Music Festival.

In this example, the collective noun ensemble requires the singular verb because the flute ensemble acts as a single unit. In this sentence, all the flutists are playing together at the same time.

  • David’s family plans to visit China this summer.

In this sentence, the collective noun family demands the singular verb plans because the family acts as a single unit. All the members of the family have the same plan.

  • A massive swarm of locusts has attacked the whole crops.

In this sentence, the collective noun swarm acts as a single unit. You, therefore, require the singular verb has to show the singularity in the sentence.

  • The pack of dogs was running off in different directions.

In this example, the collective noun pack requires the plural verb because the dogs act individually: Each dog is running in a different direction as a separate entity.

  • Every fall, the French class writes special reports on its summer reading.

In this example, the collective noun class requires the plural verb write because the students act individually: each student writes a different book report.

Subject-Verb Agreement with Indefinite Pronouns

Indefinite pronouns are non-specific words like 

  • Anybody  
  • Everybody 
  • Somebody 
  • Nobody
  • Each one 
  • Anyone 
  • Everyone  
  • No one 
  • Someone
  • Anything 
  • Everything 
  • Something 
  • Nothing
  • Each 
  • Either
  • Neither

Some of these pronouns are always singular or always plural. However, some can change their number—singular or plural, depending on the context.

It is essential to know whether an indefinite pronoun subject is singular or plural to make the verb agree.

  • Singular indefinite pronouns

A singular verb is used with these pronouns:

  • Nobody likes lemon for tea.
  • Everyone speaks at the party.
  • Something smells very different.
  • One of the keys does not fit the door lock.
  • Each of the members has the right to bring a pet.
  • Either she is fine with him.

  • Plural indefinite pronouns

A plural verb is used with the pronouns like both, few, many, and several, which always remain plural:

  • Both of them play the game very well.
  • Many of our young people go to the hospital.
  • Numerous of the neighbourhood roads need to be renewed.

  • Pronouns that can be either singular or plural

Now, let us discuss some problematic parts of subject-verb agreement for pronouns like all, more, none, and some. These words require attention to take their meaning from the word to which they refer (you can say it as a phrase following the pronoun):

  • All the milk has spilt on the table. 

 (all refers to milk and appears as singular)

  • All the boxes were sold last week. 

 (all refers to boxes and appears as plural)

  • More of the content is found online.  

(more refers to content and appears as singular)

  • More of the rules apply to you than to him. 

(more refers to rules and appears as plural)

  • None of the cake is left for me.  

(none refers to cake and appears as singular)

  • None of the images is good.  

(none refers to images and appears as plural)

  • Some bread is expired.  

(some refers to bread and appears as singular)

  • Some images are out of context.  

(some refers to images and appears as plural)

Subject-Verb Agreement for Pronoun You and I

Except for I and you, which are singular but require plural verb forms, subject-verb agreement rules apply to all personal pronouns except.

‘I’ is a singular pronoun, so why does it take plural verbs?

  • I go
  • I have
  • I belong 

A question generally comes to our minds: Why does ‘I’ agree with a singular verb when “he” and “she” take singular pronouns?

All singular nouns and the singular pronouns I, he, she takes a singular verb form. There is no plural form for the singular pronoun ‘you’. All verbs except have the same first-person singular verb form as the plural.

The second-person plural form you now replaces the old singular form thou in standard English.

Subject-Verb Agreement Uncountable Nouns

In this topic, we consider singularity and plurality. A word such as “information” is regarded as an uncountable noun. You cannot count it on your fingers. Such nouns require a singular verb.

Examples:

  • Giving is a virtue.
  • His writing is excellent.
  • Happiness is important.

Collective nouns differ from uncountable nouns. Nouns are singular in form but composed of a group, such as board, committee, company, staff, and department.

In contrast to uncountable nouns, collective nouns use singular verbs only when the group acts as a unit. If the members are acting independently, it uses a plural verb.

Examples:

English grammar is essential. (“English grammar” is an uncountable noun. Uncountable nouns take a singular verb always.)

  • The committee has announced its decision. 

Now, “Committee” is a collective noun with members acting together as a single unit, so it requires a singular verb.)

  • The members of the committee have not been able to agree on their decision. 

Now, “Committee” is a collective noun with members acting separately. Therefore, the verb is plural.

Subject-Verb Agreement Compound Subjects

When we have more than one subject in a sentence, the subject-verb agreement deals in the following style:

Using With / and

When a subject has two or more parts joined by and, treat the subject as plural and use a plural verb form.

  • My daughter and my son want me to move to London.

(plural subjects agree with a plural verb)

However, if the two joined parts refer to a single person or thing, we can use a singular verb.

  • The restaurant’s chef and helper make good food.

(singular subject (one person) / singular verb)

  •  Fish and noddles is a popular dish in China. 

(singular subject / singular verb)

Using Each / Every

When “each” or “everyone” is used with a subject with two or more parts joined, the verb is singular.

  • Every toy and game has to be put away.

(Has comes as a singular verb) 

  • Each plate and glass looks new.

(Looks comes as a singular verb)

Using OR / NOR

With compound subjects joined by or/nor, the verb agrees with the part of the subject nearer to it.

  • Her sister or her parents plan to visit her next week.
  • Neither her parents nor her sister drives a station wagon.

Subject-Verb Agreement “Do and Does”

Do is used for the first-person singular and plural, and second-person singular and plural.

  • I do.
  • We do.
  • You do.

Also, do is used for the third-person plural.

  • They do.

Does is used for the third-person singular.

  • He does
  • She does.
  • It does.

Similarly, the Subject-Verb Agreement for Does not and Do not is treated in the same fashion.

Do not is used for the first-person singular and plural, and second-person singular and plural.

  • I don’t.
  • We don’t.
  • You don’t.

Also, don’t is used for the third-person plural.

  • They don’t.

Does is used for the third-person singular.

  • He doesn’t
  • She does not.
  • It does not.

Subject-Verb Agreement with “Here and There”

In English sentences, usually, the subject comes before the verb. However, sentences beginning with “there is” or “there are” follow a different order: the subject comes after the verb is or are. Here is an example:

  • There is the cab!

The subject in this sentence is the cab. Both cab and is are singular, so both do agree. 

Here is another example:

  • There are two bags for sale.

Bags is the subject of this sentence, and it is plural, so we need the plural verb “are” to agree with the plural subject.

We can also apply the same rule to the following:

  • there was 
  • there were
  • there seems
  • appears to be 
  • there seem
  • appear to be
  • here is 
  • here are

Here are some examples:

  • There was a cat in the room.
  • There were three players on the ground.
  • There seems to be a hole in the box.
  • There appear to be multiple errors in the report.
  • Here is the world map.
  • Here are your rings.

Exception

There is an exception when there is a list of nouns as a subject. It is logical that a list of two or more items would be plural and therefore require a plural verb: in the below case, both are correct/

  • There is a bowl, noodles, and a pizza on the table.
  • There are bowls, noodles, and a pizza on the table. 

Subject-Verb Agreement “Or vs Nor”

When two or more singular nouns or pronouns are connected by or/nor, use a singular verb. 

Similarly, when a compound subject contains a singular plus a plural noun or pronoun joined by or /nor, the verb should agree with the part of the subject that is nearer the verb.

1. When the subject of a sentence is composed of two or more nouns or pronouns connected by and, use a plural verb.

  • He and his friends are at the fair.

2. When two or more singular nouns or pronouns are connected by or/nor, use a singular verb.

  • The book or the notebook is in the drawer.

3. When a compound subject contains a singular plus a plural noun or pronoun joined by or/nor, the verb should agree with the part of the subject that is nearer the verb.

  • The boy or his friends run every day.
  • His friends or the boy runs every day.

Subject-Verb Agreement “Is vs Are”

We know that we use “is” to show singularity, and, similarly, we use “and” for plurality. Let us see some examples:

  • Three miles is too far to walk.
  • Five years is the maximum sentence for that offense.
  • Ten dollars is a high price to pay.
  • Some pie is missing.
  • There is a high hurdle to jump.
  • All the pie is gone.
  • One-third of the city is educated.
  • The majority of the people are educated.
  • There are five hurdles to jump.
  • All the pies are gone.
  • Some pies are missing.
  • Here are the cups.

Subject-Verb Agreement Using “All”

The only time the object of the Preposition decides plural or singular verb forms is when noun and pronoun subjects, like the followings:

  • Some
  • Half
  • None
  • More
  • All

These all are followed by a prepositional phrase. Then the object of the Preposition determines the form of the verb. 

  • All the chicken is gone.
  • All the chickens are gone.

Subject-Verb Agreement Using “As Well As”

Whenever two subjects are joined by “as well as”, the verb agrees in number and person with the first. A verb must be plural if one of the subjects joined by or/nor is plural, and the plural subject should come close to the verb. 

Connectives like “as well as“, together with, or including do not affect the number of a subject. If the subject is singular, it stays singular and agrees with the singular verb.

EXAMPLES:

  • My friend, as well as his entire family,  is moving to London.
  • The subject (my friend) is singular. Use the singular verb ‘is’ rather than the plural verb ‘are’.
  • A flashing blue light and a sign on the vehicle refer to the police force.
  • The subject (flashing red lights) is plural. Use the plural verb warn rather than the singular verb warns. Did you notice the use of commas in the sentence?

With a plural subject, do not use commas around the additional phrase.

  • Flashing blue lights, as well as a sign on the vehicle, refer to the police force.
  • My brother, as well as my parents, are coming to the wedding.
  1. Subject-Verb Agreement with Prepositional Phrases

A prepositional phrase may be placed between the subject and verb. 

  • The player on the ground is my friend. 

The subject (man) is singular, so the verb (is) also needs to be singular. 

In the above example, the singular verb agrees with the singular subject man. Sometimes, a prepositional phrase inserted between the subject and verb makes agreement more difficult. 

  • The jeep, with many riders, was my speeding around the turn. 

The subject (jeep) is singular, so the verb (was) requires being singular as well.

 You can make a process to master it by the following instructions:

  1. Learn the significant prepositions. 
  2. Be alert for prepositional phrases placed between the subject and verb.
  3. Identify the noun in the phrase immediately as the object of a preposition: An object can NEVER be a sentence subject. 
  4. Locate the proper sentence subject and choose a verb that agrees with it. 
  • Subject-Verb Agreement with Intervening Sentences or Phrases

The subject-verb agreement is not affected by the word or clause coming between the subject and verb. Such words and phrases are called “intervening words” or “intervening phrases”. Examples of intervening words or phrases include:

  • Like
  • With
  • plus 
  • Including
  • accompanied by
  • along with
  • as well as
  • in addition to
  • one of
  • together with

Intervening phrases and clauses do not affect subject-verb agreement.

Examples: 

  • The discovery of old coins interests many historians. 
  • Emma, accompanied by Gorge, goes to the park every Sunday. 
  • The content in these websites is for learning. 
  • Her bag plus her document was left on her bus. 
  • The London club, as well as several other clubs, provides the membership. 
  • A traffic light in front market keeps the movement of vehicles under control. 
  • Each entry within the guidelines receives a thorough reading. 
  • The coach, as well as the fans, was disappointed in the team’s performance. 
  • The artwork, in addition to the jewellery, is to be auctioned off in March. 
  • David, one of my good friends, visits Germany every year. 
  • The doctor, together with his nurses, is attending a meeting. 
  • The garden, including the camp and a car, was damaged by the storm.
  • Emma, accompanied by her brother, goes to the superstore.
  • Robert, along with his friend, often helps out on his uncle’s fish farm
  • Her father, as well as her father, is going to visit China this year.
  • The president, in addition to the managers, has arrived.
  • The police officer, together with a detector, is now in the police station.

Expressions of Quantity: Subject-Verb Agreement

 

While discussing the Subject-Verb Agreement for Time, Money, and Distance,

some additional rules of thumb are observed. 

With Fractions, Percentages, and Indefinite Quantifiers: 

  • all
  • Few
  • Many
  • Much
  • Some

The verb must agree with the preceding noun (as a subject) or clause(as a subject) in the sentence:

With singular or uncountable nouns or clauses: we use a singular verb:

  • All the information is correct.
  • One-third of this data is taken up with a random selection.
  • Much of the content seems irrelevant to this topic.
  • Half of what he writes is considerable.
  • Twenty percent of the task is routine work.

With a plural noun, use a plural verb:

  • Two-third of the students have master’s degrees.
  • Many students depend on grants from the government.
  • Sixty percent of the computers have USB drives.
  • All the English students are present.

With a collective noun, use a singular or a plural verb, depending on whether you want to emphasize the single group or its members:

  • Half of my family lives in Pakistan.
  • All the class is here.
  • Ten percent of the population is bilingual.

The words majority and minority are used in a variety of ways:

When majority or minority mean an unspecified number more or less than 50%, use a singular verb:

  • The majority holds no protest.
  • A small portion of the minority indicates it supports.

When majority/minority means a specific percentage, you may use either a singular or a plural verb:

  • A 70% majority have/has voted against the decision.
  • A 20% minority are/is opposed to the decision.

When majority/minority refers to a specified set of persons, use a plural verb:

  • A majority of members have voted for a review.
  • A minority of the students are ready to learn more.

Expressions of time, money, and distance usually take a singular verb:

  • Twenty dollars is a not great deal of money for me.
  • Six kilometers is too far to walk.
  • Eight weeks is not long enough to wait.

Adjectives preceded by “the” and used as plural nouns take a plural verb:

  • The rich get richer in the modern world.
  • The poor face many hardships in life.

Expressions using the phrase number of, depending on the meaning of the phrase:

“They” take a singular verb when referring to a single quantity in a sentence:

  • The number of female students registered in the English class is 200.

They take plural verbs when they are used as indefinite quantifiers (see rule 1 above):

  • Some outstation students were late to the class.

Subject-Verb Agreement Using Currency

There is a particular case for the word dollar. When referring to an amount of money, a singular verb is required, but a plural verb is required when referring to the dollars themselves.

  • Fifty dollars is much money for a child.
  • The dollar is often used instead of Rupee in Indonesia.

Subject-Verb agreement using Units of Measurement

If a quantity is described in a sentence, it takes a singular verb form. A single quantity is treated as a single entity, which should be viewed together, not separately. The following examples show how the entire sample was added or tested at once:

  • 20 g of tissue was tested this year. 
  • Five milliliters of solvent were added to the mixture. 

Percentages are divided into two categories: 

  • A collection that we treat as a single entity (singular verb).
  • A group of individuals that we treat as a separate entity (plural verb). 

Examples:

  • 20% of the study duration was spent.
  • Ten percent of the samples were tested.

Subject-Verb Agreement in Questions

In statements, the typical sentence structure is “subject + verb”. However, questions are arranged differently. When a question is asked, the verb comes before the subject.

Helping verbs come before the subject in each case, while the rest follows the subject. There is a subject between the two parts of the verb, and the structure is “verb + subject + verb”:

  • Has Emma been working on the new project?  

(verb has + subject Emma + verb been working)

  • Does Emma play Cricketer?  

(verb does + subject Emma + verb play)

  • Have they seen the match? (verb have + subject they + verb seen)
  • Do you agree with my proposal? (verb do + subject you + verb agree)

Verbs may even come before subjects. In this case, the structure is verb + subject, as in these examples: (This is especially the case when a verb is a simple form of being: is, was, are, were.)

  • Is Emma with you? 

([verb is + subject Emma)

  • Was the match good?  

(verb was + subject concert)

  • Are the boys ready to play? 

(verb are + subject boys)

  • Were the books in your bag? 

List of all sentences understanding subject-verb agreement:

 Subject-Verb Agreement Sentences

  1. Three miles is too far to walk. 
  2. Here are the tools you need. 
  3. Five years is a good time to wait. 
  4. Ten dollars is a high price to pay.
  5. Some pie is missing. 
  6. There is a problem with my car. 
  7. The dog, who was playing in the garden, is mine. 
  8. There are five hurdles to jump. 
  9. The dog runs when he is healthy. 
  10. The dogs run when they are healthy. 
  11. The colours of the rainbow are gorgeous. 
  12. Where are the pieces in this box? 
  13. Where is the key I left on the table? 
  14. Mark and David are jumping over the mate. 
  15. Red fried beans and rice is my favourite dish. 
  16. There is a big wall to jump. 
  17. Noodles and meatballs are a great meal. 
  18. No one is there to play in the garden. 
  19. Every man and woman is responsible. 
  20. Either Emma or Mark handles the accident.
  21. Not only horses but also cats are available at the animal shelter. 
  22. Either the horses or the lion has escaped from the zoo. 
  23. Neither the lion nor the horses have escaped from the zoo. 
  24. Time and tide wait for no man. 
  25. Four quarts of oil were there. 
  26. Ten minutes is enough time to get there. 
  27. All the chicken from the cage has gone. 
  28. All the birds have feathers. 
  29. Gold and silver are precious metals. 
  30. Everybody wants to be famous. 
  31. Few were there after the break. 
  32. Standing in the water was a bad idea.
  33. Swimming in the ocean and playing drums are my hobbies. 
  34. The herd is drinking water. 
  35. The flock is flying.  
  36. The Bugs is an old movie starring Tom. 
  37. The Old Man and The Sea is my favourite novel. 
  38. This team puts on a barbecue every summer. 
  39. The flute ensemble is playing at the National Music Festival.  
  40. His family plans to visit China this summer. 
  41. A massive swarm of locusts has attacked the whole crops. 
  42. The pack of dogs is running off in different directions.  
  43. Every fall, the French class writes reports on its summer reading.
  44. Nobody likes lemon for tea. 
  45. Everyone speaks at the party. 
  46. Something smells very different.
  47. One of the keys does not fit the door lock. 
  48. Each of the members has the right to bring a pet. 
  49. Both of them play the game very well.
  50. Many of our young people go to the hospital.
  51. Several of the neighbourhood roads need attention.
  52. All the milk has spilt on the table. 
  53. More of the content is available online.  
  54. More of the rules apply to you than to him. 
  55. None of the cake is there for me. 
  56. None of the images is good. 
  57. Some bread is fresh.  
  58. Some balls are green.  
  59. Giving is a virtue. 
  60. His writing is excellent.  
  61. Happiness is important.  
  62. The committee has announced its decision. 
  63. The members of the committee have black caps.
  64. My daughter and my son want me to move to London. 
  65. The chef and the helper make a good cake. 
  66. Fish and noodles are popular dishes in China. 
  67. Each plate and glass looks new. 
  68. Her sister or her parents plan to visit her next week.
  69. Neither her parents nor her sister drives a station wagon.
  70. There is the cab.  
  71. There are two bags for sale.  
  72. There was a cat in the room.
  73. There were three players on the ground. 
  74. There seems to be a hole in the box. 
  75. There appear to be many errors in the report. 
  76. Here is the world map.  
  77. Here are your rings.
  78. There is a bowl, noodles, and a pizza on the table.  
  79. He and his friends are at the fair.  
  80. The book or the notebook is in the drawer. 
  81. The boy or his friends run every day. 
  82. His friends or the boy runs every day.
  83. All the pies are gone.  
  84. Some pie is missing.  
  85. Here are the cups. 
  86. My friend, as well as his entire family, is moving to London.  
  87. A red light, as well as a sign, refers to a danger. 
  88. Blue lights, as well as a sign on the car, refer to the police force. 
  89. My brother, as well as my parents, are coming to the wedding. 
  90. The employees, as well as the president, have visited. 
  91. The player on the ground is my friend. 
  92. Were the books in your bag?  
  93. Are the boys ready to play?  
  94. Was the match good?  
  95. Is Emma with you?  
  96. Do you agree with my proposal? 
  97. Has the team seen the play? 
  98. Does Emma play Cricketer? 
  99. Has Emma been working on the new project?
  100. Twenty percent of the sample was there.  
  101. Ten percent of the sample was positive.  
  102. 20 g of tissue was there for use.  
  103. Five milliliters of solvent were present in the mixture. 
  104. Fifty dollars is much money for a child.  
  105. Dollars are often used instead of euros in Europe.  
  106. The number of female students registered in the English class is 200.  
  107. Some outstation students were late to the class.  
  108. The rich get richer in the modern world. 
  109. The poor face many hardships in life. 
  110. Twenty dollars is not a great deal of money for me. 
  111. Six kilometers is too far to walk. 
  112. Eight weeks is not long enough to wait. 
  113. A majority of members have voted for a review.
  114. A minority of the students are ready to learn more.  
  115. A twenty percent minority is opposed to the decision.The majority holds cards. 
  116. A small minority indicates it supports.
  117. Half of my family lives in Pakistan. 
  118. All the class is there. 
  119. Ten percent of the population is bilingual.  
  120. Two-third of the students have high grades. 
  121. Many students depend on grants from UNDP. 
  122. Sixty percent of the computers have USB drives.
  123. All the English students are present.  
  124. All the information is correct. 
  125. One-third of this data is ready for analysis.  
  126. Much of the content seems irrelevant to this topic. 
  127. Half of what he writes is considerable. 
  128. Twenty percent of the task is routine work.  
  129. Emma, accompanied by Gorge, goes to the park every Sunday.
  130. The content in these websites is for learning.  
  131. Her bag plus her document was present in the class. 
  132. David, as well as several other friends, helps others. 
  133. A traffic light keeps the movement of vehicles under control. 
  134. Each entry within the guidelines receives a thorough check. 
  135. The coach, as well as the fans, was happy with the performance.  
  136. The artwork, besides the jewellery, is to be there.  
  137. David, one of my good friends, visits Germany every year. 
  138. The doctor, together with his nurses, is attending a meeting.  
  139. Emma, accompanied by her brother, goes to the club on Sunday. 
  140. Her father, as well as her uncle, is going to visit China this year.  
  141. The president, besides the managers, has arrived. 
  142. The police officer, together with a detector, is now in the police station.  
  143. The player on the ground is my friend.  
  144. The jeep, with many riders, was my speeding around the turn. 
  145. All the chicken is gone.  
  146. All the chickens are gone.  
  147. All the pie is gone. 
  148. One-third of the city is the taxpayer. 
  149. One-third of the people are a taxpayer. 

Subject-Verb Agreement Summary

In the end, the subject must agree with the verb in all decorum. Here are some finishing lines to remember:

  • Subjects and verbs must agree in case and number.
  • A singular subject needs a singular verb.
  • The plural subject requires plural verbs.
  • Multiple subjects require plural verbs.
  • Spell out the contractions to avoid confusion.
  • Uncountable nouns require singular subjects.
  • Subordinate phrases do not affect the verb agreement.

I hope with the extensive practice you will be able to cope with it entirely. One more secret is to keep reading leading newspapers loudly. The subject-verb agreement is learned unconsciously. Cheers up

Subject-Verb Agreement – Downloadable, Printable and  PDF Resources:

Subject-Verb Agreement Sentences PDF

Subject-Verb Agreement Rules PDF

Subject-Verb Agreement MCQs with Answer PDF

Subject-Verb Agreement Complete Article PDF

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